Thanks Paolo, didn't see your message there, good to have some more info.¬†<div><br></div><div>Sean¬†</div><div><br></div><div>SL</div><div>Otago, New Zealand</div><div><br></div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 8 July 2011 20:58,  <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:nanonano@mediagala.com">nanonano@mediagala.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><u></u>


  

<div bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<i><small><div class="im">>James Cameron wrote:<br>
> Is there any evidence base for repelling mosquitos using low
frequency sound? <br></div>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------</small></i><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
There is an Article that says that the experiments done with low and
high frecuencies failed:<br>
<br>
<a href="http://bugjammer.com/reports/coro/index.htm" target="_blank">http://bugjammer.com/reports/coro/index.htm</a><br>
<br>
<i>"Another type of electronic mosquito repeller is claimed to "mimic
perfectly the sound of dragon-flies, natural enemies of mosquitoes". In
this case Schreiber et al (1991) measured that the frequency emitted
was 30 Hz, much lower than the minimum frequency reported for the
mosquito wing beat (Clements 1999). Schreiber et al (1991) with field
and laboratory tests in Florida and Curtis (1994) with laboratory
trials in London, England also<u><b> report negative results of this
device </b></u>in eliciting a repellent effect on mosquito females. "<br>
<br>
<br>
</i>Paolo Benini<br>
Montevideo<i><br>
</i>
</div>

</blockquote></div><br></div>